Pest Control 101: Commercial Pest Control vs. Residential Pest Control

In every household and workplace, there is a lot of maintenance that needs to be done, and one major work that should be on this list is pest control.

This is a routine that should be followed to eliminate unwanted pests that might have been living there for a while now. It is one thing to know the do’s and don’t’s of pest control, but if the problem persists, it might be time to book an appointment with your pest control company of choice.

What most people don’t know is that there are different types of processes that companies follow when doing procedures like these. Often, clients are not aware that there are two types of pest control services: commercial and residential.

The need for both of these services can affect the people living in the household, or in a building, and also employees who go to work every day, plus the customers who consume a product or a service.

For a healthier environment in these places, pest control is usually recommended by experts. So which type of service should you go for? What are the main differences between the two?

Let’s dive right in.

Residential Pest Control

Homes are a lot smaller than commercial spaces, so generally, the process will be a lot faster for residential pest control measures.

The types of pests that you’ll see at a house also differs from what you’ll see in commercial spaces. Most homeowners would see cockroaches, rats, etc. and that’s when they would call a pest control company, or if there is a recurring infestation.

For this type of service, the experts usually already have an idea of what they are going to deal with once they show up at the facility.

In residential areas, it is generally busy, so there will be flexibility to be able to accommodate the client during their free time, which can be before work in the morning, or after office hours in the evening.

This can also extend to clients who are worried about having the pest control team in their homes while they are away.

What’s typically involved with residential pest control services? Click here to find out.

Commercial Pest Control

Since commercial spaces like office buildings are larger, the process for commercial pest control will be longer, and the cost will also be higher.

Also, there are much bigger consequences for businesses because their reputation can be tarnished with just one slip up, so pest control in high-risk industries such as food businesses is a must.

These facilities would need to be checked bi-weekly for busier places with higher infestation levels like restaurants and bars.

Daycare centers are also one example of this, as there are children who might be more at risk. Other places like hotels, with multiple locations, have a more tedious process, as the pest control team would have to inspect the areas one by one and do an assessment, or there may be the same treatment or method for all of the said locations.

As businesses have a team of engineers and a team for maintenance, the pest control technicians would also have to communicate with them to manage their expectations and to have a smoother workflow.

What’s typically involved in commercial pest control and industrial pest control procedures? Click here to read more.

A Final Word on Residential vs Commercial Pest Control

Servicing in residential areas require flexibility, but commercial spaces require this even more as they can’t just stop operations in the middle of the day to accommodate the pest control technicians.

Commercial pest control procedures tend to have quicker turnarounds to minimize disruptions of normal business operations. This also comes with a higher cost, as most businesses will prefer to get these procedures done quickly so as not to shut their doors for as long.

On the other hand, residential pest control deals with the usual suspects in terms of house pests– which means they work with more standard, and less customized procedures.

Sources

  1. University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Research and Extension
  2. Michigan State University College of Agriculture and Natural Resources